KNOWLEDGE

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for our entire organism

Why do we need Omega-3 fatty acids?

Omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids, essential for our body. Since our bodies cannot produce Omega-3s themselves, we have to get them through our food. The ratio of Omega-3 to Omega-6 plays an important role because together they regulate inflammation in our body.

The ratio of Omega-3 to Omega-6

A balance of Omega-3 and Omega-6 ensures a better function of our body in the event of inflammation. While Omega-6s tries to drive certain diseases out of our bodies through inflammation, Omega-3s ensures that the inflammation does not become excessive. At least at a balanced ratio.

These days, however, it is common for us to have a 20:1 or even a much higher ratio of Omega-6 to Omega-3. As a result, the body reacts much stronger to inflammation and disease. The reason for this is our diet: a lot of bread, meat and fat, little fish and vegetables.

Which foods contain Omega-3s?

Omega-3 fatty acids are found in numerous foods. There are three relevant Omega-3 fatty acids: ALA, EPA and DHA. ALA are short-chain Omega-3 fatty acids found only in plant foods: linseed oil, walnuts, chia seeds, etc. Unfortunately, our body processes only a very small proportion of ALAs. That’s why we need a much higher dose of ALA every day so that it can be converted into DHA and EPA in sufficient amounts. DHA and EPA are long-chain Omega-3 fatty acids, which our bodies primarily need. These can be found in algae and fatty fish, e.g. tuna, salmon or anchovies.

What are DHA and EPA good for?

“Supports brain function”

Omega-3 fatty acids are an important part of our brains. 60% are made up of fatty acids. Even in unborn children, DHA plays an important role in the development of the brain, but it does so also at an advanced age. This has been the subject of numerous studies in the field of neurology, especially when it comes to Alzheimers disease.

“Good for a healthy heart”

Omega-3 fatty acids are an important component of cell membranes and influence inflammation of the vascular walls as well as the formation of blood clots. Large studies suggest that this effect could reduce the risk of serious cardiovascular disease. “

“Promotes eyesight”

The majority of all Omega-3 fatty acids are also part of the eyes retina. Omega-3, especially DHA, are important to maintain good eyesight. The fatty acid plays an important role in blood circulation of the retina and thus has a positive effect on vision. Many studies are also examining their effect on night blindness, dry eyes and macular degeneration.

“Supports eye and brain development of unborn children”

Unborn children benefit from Omega-3 fatty acids, which is why gynaecologists recommend women to consume Omega-3 fatty acids as early as possible during pregnancy. In doing so, they mainly support the eye and brain development of their children from the very beginning. Further intake during breastfeeding is also recommended, as children develop particularly quickly in the first few months of their life.

KNOWLEDGE

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for our entire organism

Why do we need Omega-3 fatty acids?

Omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids, essential for our body. Since our bodies cannot produce Omega-3s themselves, we have to get them through our food. The ratio of Omega-3 to Omega-6 plays an important role because together they regulate inflammation in our body.

The ratio of Omega-3 to Omega-6

A balance of Omega-3 and Omega-6 ensures a better function of our body in the event of inflammation. While Omega-6s tries to drive certain diseases out of our bodies through inflammation, Omega-3s ensures that the inflammation does not become excessive. At least at a balanced ratio.

These days, however, it is common for us to have a 20:1 or even a much higher ratio of Omega-6 to Omega-3. As a result, the body reacts much stronger to inflammation and disease. The reason for this is our diet: a lot of bread, meat and fat, little fish and vegetables.

Which foods contain Omega-3s?

Omega-3 fatty acids are found in numerous foods. There are three relevant Omega-3 fatty acids: ALA, EPA and DHA. ALA are short-chain Omega-3 fatty acids found only in plant foods: linseed oil, walnuts, chia seeds, etc. Unfortunately, our body processes only a very small proportion of ALAs. That’s why we need a much higher dose of ALA every day so that it can be converted into DHA and EPA in sufficient amounts. DHA and EPA are long-chain Omega-3 fatty acids, which our bodies primarily need. These can be found in algae and fatty fish, e.g. tuna, salmon or anchovies.

What are DHA and EPA good for?

“Supports brain function”

Omega-3 fatty acids are an important part of our brains. 60% are made up of fatty acids. Even in unborn children, DHA plays an important role in the development of the brain, but it does so also at an advanced age. This has been the subject of numerous studies in the field of neurology, especially when it comes to Alzheimers disease.

“Good for a healthy heart”

Omega-3 fatty acids are an important part of our brains. 60% are made up of fatty acids. Even in unborn children, DHA plays an important role in the development of the brain, but it does so also at an advanced age. This has been the subject of numerous studies in the field of neurology, especially when it comes to Alzheimers disease.

“Promotes eyesight”

The majority of all Omega-3 fatty acids are also part of the eyes retina. Omega-3, especially DHA, are important to maintain good eyesight. The fatty acid plays an important role in blood circulation of the retina and thus has a positive effect on vision. Many studies are also examining their effect on night blindness, dry eyes and macular degeneration.

“Supports eye and brain development of unborn children”

Unborn children benefit from Omega-3 fatty acids, which is why gynaecologists recommend women to consume Omega-3 fatty acids as early as possible during pregnancy. In doing so, they mainly support the eye and brain development of their children from the very beginning. Further intake during breastfeeding is also recommended, as children develop particularly quickly in the first few months of their life.
Pregnancy, children